JEEVANJEE GARDENS AND WHY NAIROBI HAS TO CONSERVE AND IMPROVE IT.

Jeevanjee gardens sit somewhere close to the roundabout that joins town and Thika road next to the fly-over that accesses University of Nairobi if your were coming from town using Moi or Tom Mboya streets if i may use “big” names.

A statue of Alibhai Mulla Jeevanjee at the garden.
A statue of Alibhai Mulla Jeevanjee at the garden.

The garden was donated by one Indian merchant whom the garden has been names after; Alibhai Mulla Jeevanjee. He lived between 1856 and 1936 and perhaps to remind us of the tireless efforts he dedicated to providing Nairobians a place of relaxing, his statue was placed in the garden. I may not wish to ask myself why it could not be an African to donate a piece of land because trials have been made to grab the same piece the old man donated. Perhaps we have enough trees and gardens in Nairobi that we don’t need the garden anymore but remember i need it. Kenyans are known to be grabbers not minding even if it were a graveyard.IMG_20150830_172348an epitaph of one gardener (Jayant Rupalel 1946-2001) who looked after the place

That aside, Alibhai came to kenya and saw some miserable kenyans who needed to relax because some gardens are “members” gardens only. It is up to the city council to protect, conserve and improve the place. IMG_20150830_170922A lovely lawn of flowers and a foot path at the garden.

Geoffrey Ndege

Geoffrey Ndege

Geoffrey Ndege is the Editor and topical contributor for the Daily Focus. He writes in the areas of Science, Politics, Policy, Technology, Current Affairs, Opinion, Agriculture, Energy, Education, Entrepreneurship, Governance, International Emerging Issues, Society, and culture. For featuring, promotions or support write to us at ndegegeoffrey@gmail.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *